Tuesday, March 12, 2013

Meet Maggie Andrews, The Queen of Mean in "The Deception"

Photo by Fotolia
Sometimes the villains I create in my novels are downright disturbing, and Maggie Andrews certainly fits the description. She's the woman readers love to hate in The Deception.

At first glance Maggie is the last person you'd expect to be so mean. She's a stay-at-home mom who's married to Scott, a software engineer who she fell in love with when she was nineteen. They have two typical all-American kids and live in a nice home in the suburbs. She and Scott also share a passion for art collecting. Maggie believes she's living the good life. Unfortunately for her, Scott has been leading a double life, and her perfect world is about to be shattered.

Maggie's favorite hour of the day is in the morning, right after everyone else has left for the day. That's when she likes to grab a second cup of coffee and catch up on her email. Then one fateful she borrows Scott's laptop, and her life will take an unexpected turn. She'll discover that Scott has a second email account, and once her curiosity gets the better of her she'll hack her way in and learn something she never wanted to know. Her heart breaks, but whatever sympathy readers may feel for her will be short lived. A darker side of Maggie quickly emerges as she hatches a plan for revenge that will have potentially deadly consequences.

Maggie is a fictitious character who wasn't inspired by anyone I've encountered in real-life. (Thank goodness.) She's a spiteful woman who's incapable of forgiveness, even after those who have wronged her have admitted it and have apologized for their transgressions to her. She's also the personification of the concept that two wrongs never make a right. That's why readers love to hate her.
MM

Saturday, March 2, 2013

The Inspiration Behind "The Reunion"

Sometimes readers may think plots, storylines and themes of a novel are one in the same, but they're not. The theme is the idea behind the story. It's the point the author wants to make. For me, the theme can also be the inspiration that compels me to write the story. The plot is simply how the idea is expressed. The theme, or the idea behind The Reunion, is second chances. They say opportunity knocks but once, but sometimes, if we're lucky, it may come again.

I've known people who've been lucky in life. They met the man, or woman, of their dreams at a young age. Things worked out. They got married, had a few kids, and, with hard work and determination, they lived happily ever after. Then there's the rest of us. Either Prince Charming took a detour, or he turned out to be an impostor, or he got cold feet. Whatever the reason, we never got to have the "happily ever after" we wanted.

Before writing The Reunion, I had a conversation with a man who told me about reconnecting with his long-lost high school sweetheart on Facebook. They hadn't seen or heard from one another in years, but he found her, so he decided to take a chance. He contacted her. It turned out she was divorced, just like he was, so they reconnected. So far as I know, things worked out this time around, and it showed me that second chances really can happen. Sometimes people really do get a happy ending later in life. That conversation was part of my inspiration for The Reunion.

In The Reunion, leading man Ian gets scared and gets cold feet. This happens when he, and leading lady Gillian are young. After Ian ends it he moves to another another state. He soon realizes his mistake, but believing it's too late, he marries the wrong woman for the wrong reasons. In the meantime Gillian becomes a successful artist, but true love eludes her as well. Years later, fate intervenes. They meet again, and have a second chance.

The Reunion is a story of hope. The point I am making with my story is that true love not only never dies, it deserves a second chance.

MM